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π•Šπ•šπ•£ π•Žπ•šπ•π•π•šπ•’π•ž: 𝕋𝕙𝕖 β„™π•–π•£π•€π•šπ•’π•Ÿ, π•†π•£π•šπ•–π•Ÿπ•₯π•’π•π•šπ•€π•₯, π•’π•Ÿπ•• π•ƒπ•šπ•Ÿπ•˜π•¦π•šπ•€π•₯ π•π• π•Ÿπ•–π•€

π•Šπ•šπ•£ π•Žπ•šπ•π•π•šπ•’π•ž: 𝕋𝕙𝕖 β„™π•–π•£π•€π•šπ•’π•Ÿ, π•†π•£π•šπ•–π•Ÿπ•₯π•’π•π•šπ•€π•₯, π•’π•Ÿπ•• π•ƒπ•šπ•Ÿπ•˜π•¦π•šπ•€π•₯ π•π• π•Ÿπ•–π•€ By Seven Rivers  A discovery announced 237 years back this week was the key that unlocked the connected ancient history of Indians, Persians,  Europeans, and others who constitute 46% of humanity. The discovery led to a long, ongoing quest that has involved linguists, mythologists, anthropologists, archeologists, and — of late — geneticists. The man behind that discovery was an Anglo-Welsh polymath, Sir William Jones, a judge in British India and the founder of the Asiatic Society of Bengal. Sir William said at a meeting of that society on Feb 2, 1786: "The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident

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The Indo-European Journey: Stories of the Indo-Europeans, Indo-Iranians (aka Aryans), Indo-Aryans, Harappa, and the RigVedic Era